Task 41
Task 41
SHC Task 41

Solar Energy and Architecture

Publications

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The following are publications developed under Task 41:

General Publications

Task 41 Highlights 2012
January 2013 - PDF 0.12MB - Posted: 2013-02-10
Our vision - and the opportunity - is to make architectural design a driving force for the use of solar energy. Solar energy use can be an important part of the building design and the building's energy balance to a much higher extent than it is today. The development towards zero energy buildings will cause a more frequent use of building integrated solar energy systems. Due to the large size of such systems in relation to the scale of the building envelope, the architectural quality of their integration has a major impact on the final architectural quality of the building. Many solar systems do exist on the market, and with better and better energy performance. But, if they are not designed to be integrated into buildings in an appealing way, probably no building permit will be given, at least not in urban areas. And then – what is the use of a highly efficient collector if it will not be used?
Solar Energy and Architecture Annex Plan
December 2008 - PDF 0.06MB - Posted: 2008-12-30
By: Maria Wall, Jens Windeleff, Anne G. Lien
Solar energy can be utilized in buildings in several ways. Often we differentiate between two main ways to utilize solar energy. Either by letting the solar radiation transmit through windows to passively contribute to space heating and offer daylight that can reduce the electricity need for lighting. Or by using active solar systems on the building envelope to produce solar heat and electricity that can be used to reduce the building’s need for non-renewable energy supply.
Solar Energy and Architecture Annex Plan

Subtask A: Criteria for Architectural Integration

T.41.A.3/1 Designing Solar Thermal Systems for Architectural Integration
Criteria and guidelines for product and system developers
February 2014 - PDF 5.07MB - Posted: 2014-02-05
Editor: Christian Roecker & Maria Cristina Munari Probst
This document is addressed to manufacturers of solar thermal systems. It describes the main criteria for a successful integration of solar thermal systems in buildings and proposes a methodology for the design of systems specifically conceived for building integration. For each specific sub-technology, it provides a comprehensive set of practical recommendations that should lead to the production of new systems appealing to architects.
T.41.A.3/1 Designing Solar Thermal Systems for Architectural Integration
T.41.A.3/2 Designing Photovoltaic Systems for Architectural Integration
Criteria and guidelines for product and system developers
November 2013 - PDF 3.01MB - Posted: 2013-11-20
By: Klaudia Farkas, Laura Maturi, Alessandra Scognamiglio, Francesco Frontini, Maria Cristina Munari Probst, Christian Roecker, Marja Lundgren
Editor: Klaudia Farkas
This document is addressed to manufacturers of photovoltaic systems. It describes the main criteria for a successful integration of PV systems in buildings and proposes a methodology for the design of systems specifically conceived for building integration. For each specific sub-technology, it provides a comprehensive set of practical recommendations that should lead to the production of new systems appealing to architects.
T.41.A.3/2 Designing Photovoltaic Systems for Architectural Integration
T.41.A.2: Solar Energy Systems in Architecture - Integration Criteria and Guidelines
Subtask A: Criteria for Architectural Integration
March 2013 - PDF 26.66MB - Posted: 2012-09-20
By: Klaudia Farkas, Francesco Frontini, Laura Maturi, Maria Cristina Munari Probst, Christian Roecker, Alessandra Scognamiglio, Isa Zanetti
Editor: MariaCristina Munari Probst & Christian Roecker (EPFL-LESO)
This document is conceived for architects and intended to be as clear and practical as possible. It summarizes the knowledge needed to integrate active solar technologies (solar thermal and photovoltaics) into buildings, handling at the same time architectural integration issues and energy production requirements. Solar thermal and photovoltaics are treated separately, but the information is given following the same structure: 1- Main technical information; 2- Constructive/functional integration possibilities in the envelope layers; 3- System sizing and positioning criteria; 4- Good integration examples; 5- Formal flexibility offered by standard products; 6 - Innovative market products. To complete the information the manual ends with a short section dedicated to the differences and similarities between solar thermal and photovoltaic systems, with the purpose to help architects make an energetic and architecturally optimized use of the sun exposed surfaces of their buildings.
T.41.A.2: Solar Energy Systems in Architecture - Integration Criteria and Guidelines
Product Developments and Dissemination Activities
Coordinated by Subtask A
September 2012 - PDF 3.98MB - Posted: 2012-10-04
By: Miguel Pires Amado, Klaudia Farkas, Francesco Frontini, Alessia Giovanardi, Susanne Gosztonyi, Caroline Hachem, Merete Hoff, Margarethe Korolkow, Marja Lundgren, Laura Maturi, Maria Cristina Munari Probst, Christian Roecker, Alessandra Scognamiglio, Mark Snow
Editor: Gabriele Lobaccaro & Maria Wall
This document shows product developments and dissemination activities carried out within the framework of, or in close relation to, the project IEA SHC Task 41; Solar Energy and Architecture. This Task gathered researchers and practicing architects from 14 countries in the three year project whose aim was to identify the obstacles architects are facing when incorporating solar design in their projects, to provide resources for overcoming these barriers and to help improving architects’ communication with other stakeholders in the design of solar buildings. Participating countries were Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Norway, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Singapore, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland. The report gives not a complete list of activities, but shows the different types of activities to spread the findings in Task 41 and to initiate product developments in participating countries.
Product Developments and Dissemination Activities
Web-site: Innovative solar products for architectural integration
Subtask A: Criteria for Architectural Integration
September 2012 - Posted: 2012-09-14
By: MariaCristina Munari Probst, Christian Roecker, Laurent Deschamps (EPFL-LESO)
This website shows in an attractive way the innovative/inspiring solar products for building integration now available on the market. The website is dedicated to architects and has three sections: photovoltaic, solar thermal and hybrid systems. By choosing a specific technology and integration approach (roof integration, façade integration, balcony…) the user receives a selection of appropriate products, presented in the form of virtual A4 sheets. These sheets include dedicated information, contact details and pictures, both of the product alone and in situation on buildings.
T.41.A.1: Building Integration of Solar Thermal and Photovoltaics – Barriers, Needs and Strategies
Subtask A: Criteria for Architectural Integration
May 2012 - PDF 3.16MB - Posted: 2012-07-04
By: Klaudia Farkas (NTNU, Norway), Miljana Horvat (Ryerson University, Canada)
This first report of Subtask A describes the results of a large international survey on the reasons why architects do not use or rarely use solar technologies, and gives proposals to help overcome these barriers by identifying the architect’s needs in this area.
T.41.A.1: Building Integration of Solar Thermal and Photovoltaics – Barriers, Needs and Strategies

Subtask B: Methods and Tools

Solar components 3D parametric CAAD objects
Subtask B: Methods and Tools for Solar Design
September 2012 - Posted: 2012-09-14
The developed solar objects are compatible with both Graphisoft ArchiCAD and Autodesk AutoCAD. The main goals of the new tool are to speed up the rendering procedure when integrating PV systems in building design, to facilitate and stimulate the use of BiPV (Building integrated Photovoltaic) systems by architects and designers and to improve the architectural quality of BiPV systems. It was developed by the Institute for Applied Sustainability to the Built Environment (ISAAC) in collaboration with IDC AG, the Swiss national Graphisoft distributor (responsible for CAD object programming), as a part of a national Swiss project: BiPV Tools, Interactive tools and instruments supporting the design of building integrated PV installations. The modules are available for free downloads from the following website: www.bipv.ch/index.php/en/material/software
T.41.B.3 Solar design of buildings for architects: Review of solar design tools
Subtask B - Methods and Tools for Solar Design
July 2012 - PDF 11.46MB - Posted: 2012-07-04
Editor: Miljana Horvat (Ryerson University, Canada) Maria Wall (Lund University, Sweden)
The third report of subtask B presents the capabilities of 19 CAAD and BPS digital tools for solar design, in order to increase overall awareness, and provide inspiration and incentive for the future choice of tool(s). The review was carried out by using the same building model as input for all tools, as far as possible. In addition, the second part of the report presents three exemplary case stories that intend to convey valuable experience as they describe different design approaches, which tools were used and how the use of solar design tools affected the design process and final architectural design.
T.41.B.3 Solar design of buildings for architects: Review of solar design tools
T.41.B.4: Needs of architects regarding digital tools for solar building design
Subtask B - Methods and Tools for Solar Design
June 2012 - PDF 0.52MB - Posted: 2012-07-04
By: The Subtask B Expert Group
One important outcome of Task 41 is a reach-out to the industry and digital tool developers in the form of a letter, clearly stating the perceived needs of professional architects, as they had been identified through the international survey and by Task 41 experts through experience and research reviews.
T.41.B.4: Needs of architects regarding digital tools for solar building design
T.41.B.2: International Survey About Digital Tools Used by Architects for Solar Design
Subtask B: Methods and Tools for Solar Design
July 2011 - PDF 4.9MB - Posted: 2011-08-01
Editor: Miljana Horvat (Ryerson University, Canada), Marie-Claude Dubois (Université Laval, Canada), Mark Snow (University of New South Wales, Australia), Maria Wall (Lund University, Sweden)
The second stage of the project aimed at learning from users, i.e. architects, about their satisfaction with currently available tools and methods for solar design, as well as to identify obstacles that they are facing especially during the early design phase. An international survey was carried out in 14 participating countries during 2010. This deliverable is the full survey report, with a description of the survey and a detailed discussion of the results.
T.41.B.2: International Survey About Digital Tools Used by Architects for Solar Design
T.41.B.1: State-of-the-Art of Digital Tools Used by Architects for Solar Design
Subtask B - Methods and Tools for Solar Design
September 2010 - PDF 1.56MB - Posted: 2010-09-07
Editor: Marie-Claude Dubois (Université Laval) and Miljana Horvat (Ryerson University)
The first stage of work in Subtask B was to review and analyze the current software landscape available for architects, with a focus on early design phase (EDP) decisions of building projects, and to identify missing software tools and/or missing functionalities required for encouraging and enhancing solar design of buildings and the integration of solar systems and technologies. This report includes 56 software packages which were classified in three categories: CAAD (computer-aided architectural design) tools, visualization tools and simulation tools.
T.41.B.1: State-of-the-Art of Digital Tools Used by Architects for Solar Design

Subtask C: Concepts, Case Studies and Guidelines

Web-site: Case Study Collection
October 2014 - Posted: 2014-10-13
By: See each case study
Editor: Karin Kappel, Olaf Bruun Jørgensen, Merete Hoff, Marja Lundgren, Rolf Hagen, Mark Snow, Kelsey Saunders
The Collection of Case Studies include a wide range of new built or retrofitted building types such as single and multi-family housing, offices, schools and universities, stadiums, culture buildings, etc. The case studies include active solar (photovoltaic and solar thermal) and passive solar. More than 230 case studies have been proposed and evaluated by a broad range of trained architects from universities, research institutes, dissemination organisations and professional practices. 50 projects from 11 countries have been selected to the Collection of Case Studies.
T.41.C.1: The Communication Process
Subtask C: Communication Guideline
July 2012 - PDF 2.48MB - Posted: 2012-09-02
By: Doris Ehrbar, Francesco Frontini, Susanne Gosztonyi, Caroline Hachem, Rolf Hagen, Merete Hoff, Miljana Horvat, Olaf Bruun Jørgensen, Jouri Kanters, Margarethe Korolkow, Andreas Lechner, Marja Lundgren, Laura Maturi, Maria Cristina Munari Probst, Christian Roecker, Mark Snow
Editor: Rolf Hagen & Olaf Bruun Jørgensen
In order to stimulate an increased use of solar in energy conscious building design, the Task 41 participants have developed a Communication Guideline as a tool to support architects in their communication process with especially clients, authorities and contractors. Today the energy performance of solar solutions is well documented and well known especially in the “technical environment”. This knowledge, however, needs to be communicated in a convincing way to the decision makers in order to ensure a broad implementation of sustainable solar solutions in future building design. The Communication Guideline includes convincing arguments and facts supporting the implementation of solar based design solutions. The Communication Guideline is divided in three main parts:
• Part 1: Convincing clients to request and commission solar buildings
• Part 2: Communication strategies at the design/ construction team level
• Part 3: Tools and References
T.41.C.1: The Communication Process